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Orange County Districts Created 1774

Sixteen equal districts  were created within Orange County, NC in 1774, three years after Chatham county was separated from it. The districts left in Orange County were observed during the 1790 U.S. census.
Key supplied by Louise T. Overton.
1.St. Asaph
2. Chatham
3. St. David's
4. St. Martin's
5. Richmond
6. Glouster
7. Orange
8. Tryon
9. St. Thomas
10. Hillsborough
11. St. Luke's
12. St. Laurence
13. Dunsmore
14. St. James
15. St. Mary's
16. St. Mark's
Base map courtesy of Adrian B. Ettlinger's AniMap software. Abbreviations mean Caswell, Person, Alamace, Orange, and Chatham.

Orange County districts created 1774 The record was viewed by Ms. Louise T. Overton and posted at  files.usgwarchives.net/nc/orange/census/1774dist.txt
She notes: On 9 May 1777, Districts 3-4-5-6-11-12-13-14, the top eight, becaue Caswell County... After 1792 Districts 11-12-13-14 were in Person County.

From Ms. Overton's interpretation, the present writer T.L.Hardin has placed the distrits as they appear to have been assigned when the whole area was Orange County.

State Archives of North Carolina,
https://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov/BasicSearch.aspx
Title of collection "Miscellaneous records 1768-1942", MarsID: 273.103.7; Call no. CR.073.928.10 thru .14. See in box 13, "Plan for Orange County to be divided into sixteen districts, 1774."

1790 North Carolina Super Districts; Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States


The 1907 publication "Heads of Families at the First Census of the United States Taken in the Year 1790"

HTML Index

North Carolina Title Page and Map (pdf)

North Carolina Introduction, including population by DISTRICT (p. 9)(pdf)

Volume containg Hillsboro District, including Orange County (pdf)

Local copy of North Carolina 1790 districts (pdf, 2 pages). Super districts written on census forms and in indexes have caused confusion. Researchers have mistakenly interpreted them as sub-districts of counties.



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